While waiting

While I was waiting for the main event, I was almost meditating like in a desert, when I heard “I Still Haven’t Found What I’m Looking For”.

The song was over the sound system in the café section of the theatre.

It’s a U2 song. U2 were described by Time in 1987 as the greatest rock n’ roll band in the world. But they aren’t really rock n’ roll. They are rock although their sound has changed tempo from album to album, even going alternative. They have never gone country.

“I Still Haven’t Found What I’m Looking For” is the most popular single from their 1987 album The Joshua Tree. It was nominated for a Grammy.

Listening to it again today, I revisited the old feelings I had for the song back in 1987.

I loved singing along to it in my soul. But following the third section, which describes a love for what Jesus did, the section ends with the line, I still haven’t found what I’m looking for. I just couldn’t sing that.

Because I believe that what Jesus can do for someone is the beginning of a journey and not the stepping stone of a quest. Jesus satisfies the believer’s heart and sends him or her on a journey with him.

This U2 song, unfortunately, leaves me cold by the end. By the end of the third section, the song falls flat rather than resonates; I was waiting for the lyric, I have found what I’m looking for. That doesn’t fit this song.

So, where would I sit with the The Joshua Tree? It came to me today. The album’s about a quest that is barely satisfied even with knowledge about what Jesus has done.

I would not sit in the middle as I have always done. I would not sit on the positive. But when it comes to theme I would have to sit on the other side, on the negative.

The album sounds good musically, but looking at the lyrical facts of this album, it lacks the thrust of theme to fully satisfy, unfortunately.

I wish I could say otherwise, but I can’t. I don’t think my experience of the album is a solitary one. I think the feeling is not unusual, depending on who one is talking to.

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A calm spirit is better

This week writing has been writing a devotion based on old notes of my bible reading, a humor piece that I completed and submitted, and a significant revise of a poetry.

Patience and time is a key to working on pieces, though one may be tempted to get the work done fast, so one can move on to the next thing. No, don’t do that. A calm spirit is better. Patience and time gets things done better.

Why read reviews?

Hypothetically speaking, some parting words from a film reviewer who aims to stop the movie habit except for a very few movies. Don’t know who this is, but it sounds good to me:

Reading reviews of movies are not really necessary if you’re looking for a film to see. All it requires is a little research. Go to imdb.com. Watch the trailer first. Does the trailer resonate? Does the trailer give you warning signs that it might not be as good as it wants to be? Read the premise. Does the premise sound all right? Check the parents guide. Is there anything that may shock you in it? We may not need film reviews at all if we just use the information at our disposal first. Judge for yourself.

 

Winter or summer, but mostly in winter

Over the last couple of weeks I’ve been writing a children’s short story, originally intended for a picture book. The inspiration was in a garden. I may approach publishers, but on speculation that they may or may not publish it. Of course there are the usual doubts that it won’t work for children, it’s too Watership-downish, although Watership Down was a goldmine in the end. If I go ahead with it is another thing. Judson Press have sent me a copy of the North American winter issue of The Secret Place which has one of my devotions in it. Whatever the season, be it winter or summer depending on the hemisphere, I’m pleased my article’s there. Winter or summer, but it will be mostly read in the North American winter.

 

Making things right

The Killing Fields (1984) is, despite the title, real heart and soul, a wonderful sense of humanity in desperate places, based on a true story. A Cambodian interpreter is working with a New York Times journalist covering the conflict in Cambodia circa the 1970’s. Dith Pran, the interpreter, stays in Cambodia, as Sydney, the journalist, leaves the country. The Pol Pot regime takes over and Pran is imprisoned, but he attempts to escape the prison camp and flee to safety. Sydney is dealing with a guilty conscience over leaving Pran behind and tries to find him. The Killing Fields is done with a sense of horror at the atrocities of war and a thread of hope and humanity despite the horrors and how things can be made right. It is also a vivid recreation of that period.
Rating: 10/10

Commitment level

Parts of the writer’s life are as follows: desire to write, research, writing, promotion of a book, and there may be others. Each part requires commitment, but it may be that a writer finds commitment easier in one part than another. For example, does one have enough sense of  entitlement to promote one’s book? Is one committed to the promotion? I guess if there is any hint of reservation in any of these parts then it may be best not to do it and don’t waste a publisher’s or your own time. Sick to what one is committed to and work the rest out from there.