Actuate

Writers actuate. They cause a character to act in a particular way which is the meaning of actuate. In real life, there are people who would like to actuate. They would like to have you act in a particular way. Sometimes, they succeed. Actuate is one of those action-orientated words that describes the way of the writer on a character and the way of a person on somebody else. These can fuse to produce a story that is realistic–the actual manipulation of a human being as a character in a story. These can make for disturbing unpleasant stories or ones where we can detach.

Montaged to some effect

I believe in not wasting, like when it comes to food, writing, books. Use everything, reuse, don’t waste it, it means more than that. Or they tell me I’m real tidy. So, here is a montage of some photos I didn’t want to waste but had little use for them. Call it recycled art.

But is some art worth recycling?

It can be recycled all together into montaged art and a new hybrid movie. Like my montage (above)?

Not widely known

I have no idea of the matter but I trust the reference book is correct. This is on the matter of who co-wrote the play Where the Rainbow Ends. The reference book cites that Reginald Owens was a co-writer which isn’t stated on Wikipedia. The reference book says he was the brain child of the play as well.

I have a good feeling the reference book is right, although I could be wrong. Clifford Mills is cited as the co-author (along with Reginald Owens) in the reference book. On Wikipedia, Clifford Mills wrote it with John Ramsey.

But where is Reginald Owen on that Wikipedia page? “It is perhaps not widely known that the famous children’s play Where the Rainbow Ends was the brain-child of Reginald Owen…” the reference book says (Page 13, Film Review 1973-74).

Becoming the author – is one ready?

There’s always in the back of the mind of a writer of shorter material the time when he’ll be an author and gets the book contract. But does one really want to do that? The book signings, the author meet and greets, the interviews…the general busyness over your book? And does the writer really like reading books anyhow, the longer stuff that is? Can a writer be satisfied with the niche he already has and make the most of it, as much as possible? And not put all his eggs in the one writing basket?

Competition is fierce

I don’t know how many times I’ve come across the statement “competition is fierce” in writers guidelines. But it’s really true. If one goes the traditional road to getting published and not the self-publishing route, the competition to get one’s work out there, published in other words, is extremely fierce. This may be the reason why one’s work doesn’t get published. You have gone as far as doing your homework in every aspect, but the work is still rejected. As long as you know you’ve fitted the requirements and then some more, I think the reason for one’s rejection is simply, once again, that competition is fierce.

Lack of genre knowledge may not be a barrier

If freelancers do not have the precise knowledge of a genre of writing, how would freelancers get their work published in that genre? This would be because some publishers are not exacting. It’s possible to get through on one’s own merits rather than what’s usually required by the more exacting publishers. At least, that’s my experience. The editors liked my ideas, my work, and I wrote it well enough for them. I was never employed as a journalist, but I was an external contributor and I had an affinity with the type of publisher they were.